Friday, January 4, 2019

WADA updates Prohibited List for 2019

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The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has updated its List of Prohibited Substances and Methods (List) for 2019. The list was first published on 28 September 2018 but only comes into force this week. 

The List, which is one of six International Standards that are mandatory for all Signatories of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), designates what substances and methods are prohibited both in- and out-of-competition, and which substances are banned in particular sports.

Thanks to UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) we can provide you with some helpful information whether you are an athlete, a coach or a physio so that you can stay safe in the knowledge that you will always be clean and '100% Me', as per UKAD's motto.

Several of the changes relate to supplements, or ingredients commonly found within them. UKAD advises athletes to take a food-first approach to nutrition where possible, as no guarantees can ever be made that a supplement is free from banned substances.

Here are the key things you need to know about the 2019 WADA Prohibited List:-

Check your supplements carefully:

  • Epiandrosterone has been added as an example of a steroid, which can be found in some dietary supplements.
  • The examples of metabolites of steroids which the body does not naturally produce has been simplified. It now only includes those known to be found in supplements or used as masking agents.
  • More examples of substances which were already prohibited have been added, and these can be found in some supplements, so don’t get caught out. 4-methylpentan-2-amine has been included as another name for DMBA, while 5-methylhexan-2-amine (1,4-dimethylpentylamine) and 3-methylhexan-2-amine (1,2-dimethylpentylamine) were added as examples of substances related to methylhexaneamine.

The following names for substances which were already on the Prohibited List (in brackets below) have been added, so please check ingredients carefully as these may crop up.

  • Dimetamfetamine (dimethylamphetamine)
  • Enobosarm (ostarine)
  • Examorelin (hexarelin)
  • Lenomorelin (ghrelin)

More examples of prohibited substances have also been added.

  • Daprodustat (GSK1278863) and vadadustat (AKB-6548) - examples of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activating agents.
  • BAY 85-3934 - reference name of molidustat, a HIF activating agent.
  • Macimorelin - example of a growth hormone secretagogue.
  • Tretoquinol (trimetoquinol) - example of a beta-2 agonist.
  • 2-Androstenol, 3-Androstenol and 3-Androstenone - examples of substances related to 2-Androstenone.

Know your agents

  • The title of section 4.4 has changed from “Agents modifying myostatin function(s) including, but not limited, to: myostatin inhibitors” to “Agents preventing Activin receptor IIB activation”.

The following examples of prohibited substances have been added to reflect the ways in which the Activin receptor can be affected:

  • activin A-neutralizing antibodies
  • activin receptor IIB competitors such as decoy activin receptors (e.g. ACE-031)
  • anti-activin receptor IIB antibodies (e.g. bimagrumab)
  • myostatin inhibitors such as:
    1. agents reducing or ablating myostatin expression
    2. myostatin-binding proteins (e.g. follistatin, myostatin propeptide)
    3. myostatin-neutralizing antibodies (e.g. domagrozumab, landogrozumab, stamulumab)

Gene doping clarified

  • ‘Gene Doping’ has been changed to ‘Gene and Cell Doping’.
  • The definition of gene doping has changed to include the term 'post-transcriptional' to clearly define the processes that can be modified by gene editing.
  • Stem cells are not prohibited for treating injuries if their use restores normal function of the affected area, rather than enhancing function.

The List’s annual revision process is led by WADA, beginning with an initial meeting in January and concluding with the publication of the List by 1 October. This is an extensive consultation process that includes WADA’s List Expert Group gathering information, circulating a draft List among stakeholders, taking their submissions into consideration and revising the draft, followed by review by the Agency’s Health, Medical and Research (HMR) Committee.

The HMR Committee then makes its recommendation to the WADA Executive Committee, which approves the List during its September meeting.

For a substance or method to be added to the List, it must be determined that it meets two of the following three criteria:

  1. It has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance
  2. It represents an actual or potential health risk to the athletes
  3. It violates the spirit of sport

It should be noted that for athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method that is on the List, they may be accommodated if they meet the criteria outlined in the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (ISTUE). The TUE process has overwhelming acceptance from athletes, physicians and anti-doping stakeholders worldwide.

To view the changes made in the 2019 Prohibited List as compared to the 2018 version, please see the 2019 Summary of Major Modifications and Explanatory Notes.

Languages and Formats

The 2019 Prohibited List; the 2019 Summary of Modifications and Explanatory Notes; and the 2019 Monitoring Program are available for download on WADA’s website in multiple languages.

Stakeholders wishing to translate the List into other languages are kindly asked to signal their interest to info@wada-ama.org. If interested, WADA would provide the necessary files and, once the translation is finalized, would make the List available on the Agency’s website.

The List’s mobile-friendly digital edition can be accessed here.

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