Saturday, October 24, 2020

Women in Sport Week: Katie Robertson

Launched in June 2015, Women’s Sport Week featured original and curated content across local and national media, supported by Government and the wider sport industry, as the nation looked ahead to an exciting summer for women’s sport.

Women’s Sport Week was designed and launched to celebrate, raise awareness and increase the profile of women’s sport across the UK. Focusing on media coverage, elite competition, grassroots participation and workforce, the week featured original and shared content across local and national media, supported by Government and the wider sport industry, as the nation looked ahead to an exciting summer for women’s sport.

This year Women’s Sport Week runs from 24th to 30th October and each day we will be sharing a news story celebrating Scottish Swimming’s Women in Sport. Today we meet Edinburgh University swimmer Katie Robertson. Katie previously swam for South Ayrshire Swim Team until 2019, where she then joined UoE for her studies.

Who was your female role model growing up and why?

My female role model growing up was Corrie Scott. I always looked up to her as a fellow Scottish breaststroker, especially after she won bronze in the 50m breaststroke at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. I was very lucky to share a villa with her for the duration of a camp back in 2016, where I learned a lot from her both in and out of the pool.

Why is it important to look up to a role model?

It’s important to have a female role model so that we can have someone to aspire to be like as we get older. I will always remember the first time that I was in the same race as Corrie, and got to experience racing against her as opposed to just watching from the stands. It was such a confidence-boosting moment!

How accessible is your sport for women, and what barriers are there that we need to look to overcome?

In my experience, I have always found the sport very accessible and inclusive as a female. A few years ago, I was involved in the Scottish Swimming ‘Project Ailsa’ camps, which allowed us to train alongside elite female athletes. I am now currently part of the Project Ailsa advisory group, which has the aim to create an environment where females can flourish in the sport, which is very rewarding to be a part of! Females typically have a higher dropout rate in sports in general, which is why it’s important to promote female sport and female athletes as much as possible. 

What is your greatest achievement?

My biggest achievements so far are representing Great Britain at multiple junior international events, and winning Scottish senior titles in 2018/19.

What would you say to your younger self as a young women beginning in sport?

Something I would tell my younger self is to ensure I enjoy the entire swimming journey. Sport has a lot of highs and lows, but we all started competitive swimming because of our love for the sport, so it’s important to remember that - especially through the more challenging times. 

#SheCanSheWill